Wellesley Historical Society

No Glasses Needed to View This Solar Eclipse!

         

August 15, 2017

With an upcoming solar eclipse on August 21st, I was inspired to pull out the Denton collection of lantern slides. The first is of a solar eclipse and the second is a more rare, "orrery" mechanical lantern slide. The orrery lantern slide shows the movement of the solar system when rotated with a hand crank. The image on the left shows the entire slide while the image on the right is a close up with light coming through. 

These lantern slides were used by Wellesley resident William Denton (1823-1883) to illustrate his many scientific lectures.  These lantern slides are composed of images on glass encased in a wooden frame. The slides were used with magic lanterns, an early form of a slide projector, first invented in the 17th century.  Popularized in the 19th century, they were used for both entertainment and educational purposes (see image below).

William Denton was a geologist and writer who traveled extensively in the 1870s through the early 1880s giving lectures with the visual aid of his magic lantern projector.  Denton’s lectures and published works focused on science, religion, spiritualism and politics. The Wellesley Historical Society has Denton’s magic lantern, hundreds of lantern slides, and lecture notes with titles such as “Our Planet,” “Is Darwin Right?” and “Where does Beauty Dwell?”  

William Denton was the father of William D. and Robert W. Denton, internationally known for their stunning butterfly specimens, innovative mounts and jewelry. Established in 1895, The Denton Brothers company was located in a barn on Denton Road near the family homestead.

Kathleen Fahey, Curator  

 

The Malden Trinopticon illustrated in The Magic Lantern Manual by W.J. Chadwick, published in 1878, is almost identical to William Denton's magic lantern found in the collection of the Wellesley Historical Society.  This model features three lenses instead of the more common single or double lens construction.  Multiple lenses provided dissolving views, allowing one image to fade away as the next began to appear.



Denton Watercolors in Bloom!

                

Spring brings our annual collaboration with the Wellesley Hills Garden Club as they select a series of items from the Wellesley Historical Society collection to inspire floral arrangements. This year, the WHGC was inspired by the colorful and detailed watercolors of tropical fish by Wellesley’s own Sherman Denton (1856-1937).  Six groups presented their elegant interpretations of Denton’s watercolors at their annual meeting on May 10th at the Wellesley Country Club. Kathleen Fahey, Curator of the Wellesley Historical Society was on hand to speak to the WHGC about the history of the turn of the twentieth-century watercolors from the Denton collection. The Wellesley Hills Garden Club also gave a nod to Denton by creating delightful aquatic centerpieces for each table, complete with a colorful beta fish!

The image above shows a Sherman Denton watercolor of a goatfish, c.1900 with its floral interpretation by the Wellesley Hills Garden Club.

Kathleen Fahey, Curator

 

More on Sherman Denton

Sherman F. Denton was born on Sept. 24, 1856 in Dayton, Ohio to William and Elizabeth Foote Denton.  The Denton family moved to Wellesley in the 1860s and lived off of Washington Street in the area now known as Denton Road.  The Denton family were avid naturalists and Sherman’s younger brothers were internationally known for their butterfly specimens sold through the Denton Brothers Company. Sherman assisted his brothers in this business by developing and patenting a plaster mount for the butterflies in 1894.
Sherman Denton was a skilled artist and taught himself to draw and paint.  In the late 1880s, Sherman was hired by the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries to create taxidermy specimens of fish.  His painting skills were put to excellent use as the skin of a fish loses its coloration as it dries.  To record the natural shape and color of the freshly-caught fish, Sherman painted detailed watercolors of the specimen which he then referenced to create the mounted and painted fish.  He also patented a method of mounting the preserved fish skin over a papier-mâché form, creating a surprisingly life-like model that was in great demand in U.S. museums. 
Denton is perhaps most well-known for the chromo-lithographic prints of his fish illustrations that were published by the State of New York Fisheries, Game and Forest Commission at the turn of the twentieth century.  These prints proved to be collectible immediately after publication and continue to be popular with collectors today. 
Sherman F. Denton lived with his wife and two children in Wellesley for several years before moving to Weston.  He died at his home on June 24, 1937 at the age of 81 and is buried at the Woodlawn Cemetery in Wellesley.   


Halloween History Highlight

October 30, 2015

This lantern slide of a spooky vampire bat was used by Wellesley resident William Denton (1823-1883) to illustrate one of his many scientific lectures.  Lantern slides are composed of images on glass encased in a wooden frame. These slides were used with magic lanterns, an early form of a slide projector, first invented in the 17th century.  Popularized in the 19th century, they were used for both entertainment and educational purposes (see image below).

William Denton was a geologist and writer who traveled extensively in the 1860 and 1870s giving lectures with the visual aid of his magic lantern projector.  Denton’s lectures and published works focused on science, religion, spiritualism and politics. The Wellesley Historical Society has Denton’s magic lantern, lantern slides, and lecture notes with titles such as “Our Planet,” “Is Darwin Right?” and “Where does Beauty Dwell?”  

William Denton was the father of William D. and Robert W. Denton, internationally known for their stunning butterfly specimens, innovative mounts and jewelry. Established in 1895, The Denton Brothers company was located in a barn on Denton Road near the family homestead.

Kathleen Fahey, Curator  

 

The Malden Trinopticon illustrated in The Magic Lantern Manual by W.J. Chadwick, published in 1878, is almost identical to William Denton's magic lantern found in the collection of the Wellesley Historical Society.  This model features three lenses instead of the more common single or double lens construction.  Multiple lenses provided dissolving views, allowing one image to fade away as the next began to appear.


 





Denton Butterflies in Bloom!

Denton Butterflies in Bloom!

Spring brings our annual collaboration with the Hills Garden Club of Wellesley, when garden club members create floral arrangements inspired by the Wellesley Historical Society's collection.  This year, six specimens from the Denton Butterfly Collection were selected to inspire these elegant arrangements. 

The Denton Brothers was a successful local business started by Wellesley residents William D. and R. Winsford Denton in 1895.  The brothers, better known as Willie and Winsey, sold their patented butterfly mounts at exhibitions throughout America and also locally from their shop on Denton Road.  The Wellesley Historical Society is fortunate to have both the Denton Brothers business papers and a collection of over 2,400 Denton entomology specimens from the turn of the twentieth century.  

Each arrangement was created by a group of Hills Garden Club members and revealed at their annual meeting and luncheon on May 13th at the Wellesley Country Club.  Floral interpretations were exhibited alongside each Denton butterfly and truly captured the essence of each delicate specimen

Pictured above is a Prioneric Clemanthe specimen from the WHS Denton Brothers Butterfly Collection along with its floral accompaniment. This group arrangement was led by Hills Garden Club President Cynthia Ballantyne and former President Lucy Lynch.


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